• Bedside Manners

    Neil Peart

    Hungry fans can finally satisfy their craving for information about ER the most popular show on network television - and George Clooney, the gorgeous and irresistibly charming star. Bedside Manners will be required reading for ER devotees, who will find a wealth of information here - from an inside look at ER and its creator, Michael Crichton, to a viewer's companion featuring detailed reviews of each and every episode of the show and a guide to its cast and characters. There's also a complete Internet guide to Clooney and ER , the "authoritative" ER Drinking Game, and a section of "Clooneyisms" - unusual quotes and bizarre anecdotes from Clooney, and the characters he's portrayed. Keenleyside includes something for everyone in this funny, fact-filled, and indispensable book.

  • Roadshow

    Neil Peart

    For thirty years, drummer, author, and songwriter Neil Peart had wanted to write a book about "the biggest journey of all in my restless existence: the life of a touring musician." Finally, the right time, and the right tour . . .

    In the summer of 2004, after three decades, twenty gold albums, and thousands of performances spanning four continents, the band Rush embarked on a celebratory 30th Anniversary World Tour. The "R30" tour traveled to nine countries, where the band performed fifty-seven shows in front of more than half a million fans. Uniquely, Peart chose to do his between-show traveling by motorcycle, riding 21,000 miles of back roads and highways in North America and Europe - from Appalachian hamlets and Western deserts to Scottish castles and Alpine passes.

    Roadshow illuminates the daunting rigors of a major international concert tour, as well as Peart's exploration of the scenic byways and country towns along the way. His evocative and entertaining prose carries the reader through every performance and every journey, sharing the bittersweet reflections triggered by the endlessly unfolding landscape. Observations and reflections range from the poignantly, achingly personal to the wickedly
    irreverent.

    Part behind-the-scenes memoir, part existential travelogue, Roadshow winds through nineteen countries on both sides of the Atlantic, in search of the perfect show, the perfect meal, the perfect road, and an elusive inner satisfaction that comes only with the recognition that the journey itself is the ultimate destination.

    The inner workings of the tour, the people Peart works with and the people he meets, the roads and stages and ever-changing scenery - all flow into an irresistible story.

  • Depp

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    The truth behind Johnny Depp's bad-boy image in this definitive biography. Accidental actor? Bratty bad boy? Consummate craftsman? Take a little of each, and a whole lot more, and you've got Johnny Depp. Delectably dreamy, dramatically dynamic, and Depp-endably dedicated, this young actor is one of Hollywood's most popular leading men. Depp takes us on a wild ride through Johnny's life, its ups and its downs, its pinnacles and its depths. Join author Christopher Heard, an ardent fan and host of TV's Reel to Real, as he follows Depp's turbulent childhood in Kentucky, his leap into the limelight on TV's 21 Jump Street, and, finally, his extraordinary success in some of his generation's best films. Edward Scissorhands, What's Eating Gilbert Grape?, Donnie Brasco, Ed Wood, Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas - no other actor his age has such an incredibly diverse résumé. Depp explores his roles in these films and his relationships with their directors. Heard also provides as context the details of Depp's personal life - from his young marriage, through his years as tattooed Winona Ryder escort and as Kate Moss paramour to his current status as proud Parisian papa and Paradis lover. Scrutinizing Johnny's shifts as media darling and tabloid target and sifting the truth from the trash in what's been said about him, Depp is the definitive biography of one of this generation's most important, most impassioned, and most independent stars.

  • Thirteen-year-old October Schwartz is new in town, short on friends, and the child of a clinically depressed science teacher. Naturally, she spends most of her time in the Sticksville Cemetery, which just happens to border her backyard. And that backyard

  • Down The Tube

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    A couch potato's downward spiral. Imagine yourself at home on your couch, contractually obligated to remain in front of your satellite-rigged television for a period of seven days, at the end of which you will produce a funny but penetrating account of your journey - a virtual one - through the strange and culturally revealing landscape of the 200-channel universe. Bill Brownstein did just that and Down the Tube is his hilarious survival guide, complete with the expert testimony of a psychologist who kept tabs on the couch potato's mental state. The author of the riotous Sex Carnival charts his week on the couch in this latest odyssey with a cynical eye and relentless wit. Brownstein meditates on such important questions as: Should Pamela Anderson sue the doctor who botched her breast reduction? Are those people on Springer for real? Hey, do they still play reruns of The Waltons? Nobody is immune to Brownstein's wry wit, not even big-name celebrities like Oprah, Regis, and Jerry Seinfeld.

  • Inside The West Wing

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    For anyone who's ever wished the American president's name was Bartlet ?Since bursting onto the airwaves in 1999, The West Wing has emerged as one of North America's favourite TV shows - and for good reason. Through its snappy dialogue, Washington-insider references and stellar acting, the show, produced and written by Aaron Sorkin of The American President and A Few Good Men fame, looks at U.S. politics like no other TV series has before.

    As a testament to the show's success, it copped nine Emmy Awards - an all-time record - in September 2000. Its all-star cast, which includes Martin Sheen, Rob Lowe, Alison Janney, and John Spencer, is regularly praised in the press, and the second-season-opener, "Who Shot President Bartlet," aired to record ratings in the fall of 2000.

    In Inside the West Wing, author Paul Challen takes a detailed look at this hugely popular series: how it's put together, what ideas and political themes drive its plots, and ultimately, why it's so popular. Through in-depth interviews, commentary from political and entertainment-industry observers, plus extensive searches of the numerous official and un-official show Web sites available in cyberspace, Challen provides a comprehensive look inside the show for die-hard fans and casual watchers alike. To round out the package, Inside the West Wing also contains actor profiles, and an episode-by-episode guide to the first two seasons.

  • Traveling Music

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    Neil Peart decided to drive his BMW Z-8 automobile from L.A. to Big Bend National Park, in Southwest Texas. As he sped along "between the gas-gulping SUVs and asthmatic Japanese compacts clumping in the left lane, and the roaring, straining semis in the right," he acted as his own DJ, lining up the CDs chronologically and according to his possible moods.

    "Not only did the music I listened to accompany my journey, but it also took me on sidetrips, through memory and fractals of associations, threads reaching back through my whole life in ways I had forgotten, or had never suspected.? Sifting through those decades and those memories, I realized that I wasn't interested in recounting the facts of my life in purely autobiographical terms, but rather ? in trying to unweave the fabric of my life and times. As one who was never much interested in looking back, because always too busy moving forward, I found that once I opened those doors to the past, I became fascinated with the times and their effect on me. The songs and the stories I had taken for granted suddenly had a resonance that had clearly echoed down the corridors of my entire life, and I felt a thrill of recognition, and the sense of a kind of adventure. A travel story, but not so much about places, but about music and memories."

  • Never Too Fast

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    The true story of the most dangerous racecar driver on the circuit ? Paul Tracy was just a youngster when he discovered fast cars. Growing up in West Hill, Ontario, Paul dreamt of his hero Gilles Villeneuve, and when his father left him at the local go-kart track with a full tank of gas each morning, he retrieved Paul - and the empty tank - at night.
    Tracy rose quickly through racing's minor leagues, setting and breaking records as he went. At 17 he was racing cars with twice the horsepower of the family cars his friends were just learning to drive. Veteran team managers and drivers knew they were seeing someone special on the track: a quiet kid with the looks of a boy scout and the desire of a champion. Soon Tracy dominated kart racing, won at Can-Am racing, and ruled Indy Lights. He then stormed into the Championship Auto Racing Team circuit, racing wheel to wheel with Emerson Fittipaldi and Mario Andretti. In those early races, even driving an underpowered car, Tracy proved he could run with the big boys.
    But Paul Tracy's success has come with its share of hardships. His aggressive driving style on the cart circuit has made almost as many enemies as fans. He's been criticized, penalized, and vilified both on and off the track. Nevertheless, two things remain consistent - his desire to drive fast, and his desire to win.
    When you live in a world of speed and danger, a world where success is measured in tenths of seconds and inches can separate winners from losers, one thing is certain: you can never be too fast.

  • Neil Peart's travel memoir of thoughts, observations, and experiences as he cycles through West Africa, reveals the subtle, yet powerful writing style that has made him one of rock's greatest lyricists. As he describes his extraordinary journey and his experiences - from the pains of dysentery, to a confrontation with an armed soldier, to navigating dirt roads off the beaten path - he reveals his own emotional landscape, and along the way, the different "masks" that he discovers he wears.

    "Cycling is a good way to travel anywhere, but especially in Africa. You are independent and mobile, and yet travel at people speed - fast enough to travel on to another town in the cooler morning hours, but slow enough to meet people: the old farmer at the roadside who raises his hand and says, 'You are welcome,' the tireless women who offer a smile to a passing cyclist, the children whose laughter transcends the humblest home."

  • Neil Peart decided to drive his BMW Z-8 automobile from L.A. to Big Bend National Park, in Southwest Texas. As he sped along "between the gas-gulping SUVs and asthmatic Japanese compacts clumping in the left lane, and the roaring, straining semis in the right," he acted as his own DJ, lining up the CDs chronologically and according to his possible moods.

    "Not only did the music I listened to accompany my journey, but it also took me on sidetrips, through memory and fractals of associations, threads reaching back through my whole life in ways I had forgotten, or had never suspected.? Sifting through those decades and those memories, I realized that I wasn't interested in recounting the facts of my life in purely autobiographical terms, but rather ? in trying to unweave the fabric of my life and times. As one who was never much interested in looking back, because always too busy moving forward, I found that once I opened those doors to the past, I became fascinated with the times and their effect on me. The songs and the stories I had taken for granted suddenly had a resonance that had clearly echoed down the corridors of my entire life, and I felt a thrill of recognition, and the sense of a kind of adventure. A travel story, but not so much about places, but about music and memories."

  • Following in the tradition of Ghost Rider and Traveling Music, Rush drummer Neil Peart lets us ride with him along the backroads of North America, Europe, and South America, sharing his experiences in personal reflections and full-color photos. Spanning almost four years, these 22 stories are open letters that recount adventures both personal and universal - from the challenges and accomplishments in the professional life of an artist to the birth of a child. These popular stories, originally posted on Neil's website, are now collected and contextualized with a new introduction and conclusion in this beautifully designed collector's volume.

    Fans will discover a more intimate side to Neil's very private personal life and will enjoy his observations of natural phenomena. At one point, he anxiously describes the birth of two hummingbirds in his backyard; at the same time, his wife is preparing for the birth of their daughter - a striking synchronicity tenderly related to readers.

    A love of drumming, nature, art, and the open road threads through the narrative, as Neil explores new horizons, both physical and spiritual. This is the personal, introspective travelogue of rock's foremost drummer, enthusiastic biker, and sensitive husband and father. Far and Away is a book to be enjoyed again and again, like letters from a distant friend.

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