Penguin Publishing Digital

  • The Story of the Stone (c.1760) is one of the greatest novels of Chinese literature. The first part of the story, The Golden Days, begins the tale of Bao-yu, a gentle young boy who prefers girls to Confucian studies, and his two cousins: Bao-chai, his parents' choice of a wife for him, and the ethereal beauty Dai-yu. Through the changing fortunes of the Jia family, this rich, magical work sets worldly events - love affairs, sibling rivalries, political intrigues, even murder - within the context of the Buddhist understanding that earthly existence is an illusion and karma determines the shape of our lives.

  • Anglais Hitler

    Kershaw Ian

    Now at last in a single, abridged volume - the definitive life.When the two volumes of Ian Kershaw's biography of Hitler, Hitler 1889-1936: Hubris and Hitler 1936-1945: Nemesis were published, they were immediately greeted around the world as the essential works on perhaps the most malign figure ever to hold power in modern Europe. In the face of considerable demand for such an edition, Kershaw has now created a single volume version. The result is a frightening, fascinating narrative of how a bitter provincial failure from an obscure corner of Austria rose to unparalleled power; how the half-baked, contemptible ideas of a vagrant former art student coalesced into an ideology that for twelve horrific years shaped the fate of millions; and how both in his determination to impose his will militarily and to fend off his many enemies he unleashed a genocidal Armageddon. No one individual can stand in as the scapegoat for the vast social, technological, economic and military forces that shape our societies - but if ever there was one man whose ideas and personality shaped and cowed those forces, as well as embodying them, it was Hitler. This is his story and Kershaw tells it with unique authority, and with moral anger.

  • The Story of the Stone (c. 1760), also known by the title of The Dream of the Red Chamber, is the great novel of manners in Chinese literature.
    Divided into five volumes, of which The Warning Voice is the third, it charts the glory and decline of the illustrious Jia family (a story which closely accords with the fortunes of the author's own family). The two main characters, Bao-yu and Dai-yu, are set against a rich tapestry of humour, realistic detail and delicate poetry, which accurately reflects the ritualized hurly-burly of Chinese family life. But over and above the novel hangs the constant reminder that there is another plane of existence - a theme which affirms the Buddhist belief in a supernatural scheme of things.

  • In 1915, Edgar Lee Masters published a book of dramatic monologues written in free verse about a fictional town called Spoon River, based on the Midwestern towns where he grew up. The shocking scandals and secret tragedies of Spoon River were immediately recognized by readers as authentic. Masters raises the dead "sleeping on the hill" in their village cemetery to tell the truth about their lives, and their testimony topples the American myth of the moral superiority of small-town life. Spoon River, as undeniably corrupt and cruel as the big city, is home to murderers, drunkards, crooked bankers, lechers, bitter wives, abusive husbands, failed dreamers, and a few good souls. The freshness of this masterpiece undiminished, Spoon River Anthology remains a landmark of American literature.
    With an Introduction by John Hollander and an Afterword by Ronald Primeau

  • À la carte wisdom from the international bestseller Bringing up Bébé
    In BRINGING UP BEBE, journalist and mother Pamela Druckerman investigated a society of good sleepers, gourmet eaters, and mostly calm parents. She set out to learn how the French achieve all this, while telling the story of her own young family in Paris.
    BEBE DAY BY DAY distills the lessons of BRINGING UP BEBE into an easy-to-read guide for parents and caregivers. How do you teach your child patience? How do you get him to like broccoli? How do you encourage your baby to sleep through the night? How can you have a child and still have a life?
    Alongside these time-tested lessons of French parenting are favorite recipes straight from the menus of the Parisian crèche and winsome drawings by acclaimed French illustrator Margaux Motin.
    Witty, pithy and brimming with common sense, BEBE DAY BY DAY offers a mix of practical tips and guiding principles, to help parents find their own way.

  • Danger and desire become one in Denise Rossetti’s “hot, steamy, sexy, and downright yummy” (Fresh Fiction) novella of a soldier who crosses the line into the most forbidden territory of all...
    A battle-scarred veteran of love and war, Captain Rhio of the Queen’s Guard has never met a woman as fierce, as fascinating, as the foreign slave dancer, Amae. Her Dance of the Battle Maiden is so scandalous the captain has to quell a riot at Her Majesty's very proper reception for the Trinitarian ambassador. Fortunately, he's accustomed to taking command.
    Everything male in Rhio is aroused and challenged by Amae's untamed spirit. Despite his suspicions about her, he can't resist taking a single night to lose himself in her dark wild beauty. The dancer has the heart of a warrior and a nefarious purpose she won't disclose. She's up to her pretty little neck in political intrigue, treachery and murder, but for some stupid reason, Rhio can't make himself walk away. Amae might just get him killed before they're through, but gods, what a glorious way to go!
    Includes a preview of The Dark Rose
    Rhio's Dancer previously appeared in Laced with Desire

  • San Francisco Judge Ramsey Hunt, longtime friend to FBI agents Lacey Sherlock and Dillon Savich, is presiding over the trial of Clive and Cindy Cahill – accused in a string of murders – when the proceedings take a radical turn. Federal prosecutor Mickey O'Rourke, known for his relentless style, becomes suddenly tentative in his opening statement, leading Hunt to suspect he’s been threatened – suspicions that are all but confirmed when Hunt is shot in the back.
    Savich and Sherlock receive news of the attack as an ominous note is delivered to Savich at the Hoover Building: YOU DESERVE THIS FOR WHAT YOU DID. Security tapes fail to reveal who delivered the tapes. Who is behind the shooting of Judge Ramsey Hunt? Who sent the note to Savich? And what does it all mean? Savich and Sherlock race to San Francisco to find out…watching their backs all the while.

  • More information to be announced soon on this forthcoming title from Penguin USA.

  • The Number One Ladies' Detective Agencymeets Pedro Almodovar in this outrageous new series featuring an ultraglamorous sleuth
    Bestsellers in Mehmet Murat Somer's home country of Turkey and set to take the world by storm, the arrival of the Hop-Çiki-Yaya mysteries is cause for excitement (and lip gloss!) here in the United States. A male computer technician by day and a transvestite hostess of Istanbul's most notorious nightclub by night, the unnamed heroine of The Kiss Murder is the most charming and hilarious sleuth to debut in recent memory. When Buse, one of the "girls"at her club, fears someone is after private letters from a former lover, she comes to her boss for help. The next day Buse is dead and our girl must find the murderers before they find her. Fortunately, she is well armed with beauty, wit, the wardrobe of Audrey Hepburn, and expert Thai kickboxing skills. With a page-turning plot and an irresistibly charming protagonist, The Kiss Murder is sure to attract mystery lovers and nightlife mavens alike.

  • The number 1 New York Times-bestselling author is back with an electrifying new entry in the FBI series featuring Savich and Sherlock.
    FBI Special Agent Griffin Hammersmith, last seen in Backfire, has been recruited by Dillon Savich to join his unit in Washington, D.C. Savich sees something special in Hammersmith, an almost preternatural instinct for tracking criminals.
    While on his way to D.C., Hammersmith plans to visit his sister, Delsey, a student at Stanislaus School of Music in Maestro, Virginia. Before he arrives, he gets a phone call that Delsey was found naked, unconscious, and covered with blood after a wild party. The blood isn't hers--so who does it belong to?
    Meanwhile, back in D.C., Savich and Sherlock have their hands full when the grandson of former chairman of the Federal Reserve Bank is found murdered, every bone in his body broken, and frozen at the foot of the Lincoln Memorial.
    Was Savich right--is Griffin gifted with a unique ability to "see" how criminals think? And will he figure out who was behind the attempt on Delsey's life--before it's too late?

  • One of the nation’s most respected Egyptologists examines the compelling mystery behind the death of King Tutankhamen.
    “CAN THE TRUTH BE KNOWN ABOUT A POSSIBLE MURDER THAT WOULD HAVE BEEN COMMITTED 3,000 YEARS AGO? Respected Egyptologist Bob Brier, specialist in paleopathology and host of The Learning Channel’s acclaimed series The Great Egyptians, believes it can. Skillfully combining known historical events with evidence gathered by advanced technologies, Brier has re-created the suspenseful story of religious upheaval and political intrigue that likely resulted in the murder of the teenage king Tutankhamen…Breathing life into old bones and artifacts, Brier examines all available evidence to arrive at ‘the most reasonable explanation for a tragic event,’ an explanation that, he says, is testable through the use of current technology on the mummified remains of the ancient king.”--Booklist (starred review)
    “BRIER’S 3,000-YEAR-OLD MYSTERY STEADILY DRAWS THE READER into the curious and exotic world of Egyptology…By the time you finish his intrigue-filled reconstruction of Tutankhamen’s world--which includes such elements as teenage love, religious heresy, the Orwellian rewriting of history and the desperate pleas of a terrified queen--you risk coming to care a good deal about the young Pharaoh’s fate…We can be grateful to Dr. Brier for showing that even a mystery dating to the 14th century B.C. is subject to engrossing examination.”--The New York Times
    WITH AN INTRODUCTION BY THE AUTHOR
    INCLUDES 16 PAGES OF PHOTOS

  • ONE OF PUBLISHERS WEEKLY'S BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR
    Master storyteller Sharon Shinn has thrilled readers with her national bestselling Twelve Houses series. Now experience her original new novel in which love and loyalty are tested at every turn....
    For fifteen years, Maria Devane has been desperately, passionately in love with Dante Romano. But Maria knows that Dante can never give everything of himself back--at least not all of the time. Every month, Dante shifts shape, becoming a wild animal. He can't choose when he shifts, the transition is often abrupt, and, as he gets older, the time he spends in human form is gradually decreasing.
    Maria has kept his secret since the beginning, knowing that their love is worth the danger. But when a string of brutal attacks occurs in local parks while Dante is in animal form, Maria is forced to consider whether the lies she's been telling about her life have turned into lies she's telling herself...

  • The world's leading expert on vitamin D reveals the missing link to achieving optimal health Vitamin D deficiency is the most common medical condition in the world. In America alone, over 200 million people lack sufficient levels of vitamin D and may consequently suffer from chronic health conditions, ranging from daily annoyances like fatigue and pain to life-threatening illnesses such as diabetes, heart disease, and cancer. But few people know why vitamin D is so important and what they can do to avoid the myriad ailments associated with deficiency, including heart disease, cancer, and osteoporosis. There is no better person to demystify this vitamin and showcase its place in human health than author Michael F. Holick, M.D., Ph.D.-the father of modern vitamin D research. With more than three decades spent studying the relationship between vitamin D, limited sun exposure, and human well-being, Dr. Holick shares his findings on how combining the natural curative properties of the sun along with small lifestyle changes can help everyone to live a substantially healthier life. Armed with a three-step plan incorporating safe amounts of sun exposure, the right supplementation, and eating foods rich in vitamin D, Dr. Holick provides prescriptive advice for anyone- from relatively healthy people to those suffering from chronic or even fatal diseases- on how to easily rebuild and maintain optimal levels of this essential hormone. Rich with anecdotes and entertaining case studies, The Vitamin D Solution also presents research from around the world to serve as a wake-up call on this potentially lifesaving hormone for health.

  • Elizabeth Gilbert, author of The Signature of All Things and Eat, Pray, Love
    “What a cool and fascinating ride. Leigh Ann Henion has tackled one of the great questions of contemporary, intelligent, adventurous women: Is it possible to be a wife and mother and still explore the world? Her answer seems to be that this is not only possible, but essential. This story shows how. I think it will open doors for many.”
    Heartfelt and awe-inspiring, Leigh Ann Henion’s Phenomenal is a moving tale of physical grandeur and emotional transformation, a journey around the world that ultimately explores the depths of the human heart. A journalist and young mother, Henion combines her own varied experiences as a parent with a panoramic tour of the world’s most extraordinary natural wonders.
    Phenomenal begins in hardship: with Henion deeply shaken by the birth of her beloved son, shocked at the adversity a young mother faces with a newborn. The lack of sleep, the shrinking social circle, the health difficulties all collide and force Henion to ask hard questions about our accepted wisdom on parenting and the lives of women. Convinced that the greatest key to happiness--both her own and that of her family--lies in periodically venturing into the wider world beyond home, Henion sets out on a global trek to rekindle her sense of wonder.
    Henion’s quest takes her far afield, but it swiftly teaches her that freedom is its own form of parenting--one that ultimately allows her to meet her son on his own terms with a visceral understanding of the awe he experiences every day at the fresh new world. Whether standing on the still-burning volcanoes of Hawai‘i or in the fearsome lightning storms of Venezuela, amid the vast animal movements of Tanzania or the elegant butterfly migrations of Mexico, Henion relates a world of sublimity and revelation.
    Henion’s spiritual wanderlust puts her in the path of modern-day shamans, reindeer herders, and astrophysicists. She meets laypeople from all over the world, from all walks of life, going to great lengths to chase migrations, auroras, eclipses, and other phenomena. These seekers trust their instincts, follow their passions, shape their days into the lives they most want to lead. And, somewhere along the way, Leigh Ann Henion becomes one of them.
    A breathtaking memoir, Phenomenal reveals unforgettable truths about motherhood, spirituality, and the beauty of nature.
    Oprah.com
    "Part travel memoir, part parenting manifesto and part inquiry into those 'fleeting, extraordinary glimpses of something that left us groping for rational explanations in the quicksand of all-encompassing wonder.'"
    From the Hardcover edition.

  • A surprising new look at the rise of ADHD in America, arguing for a better paradigm for diagnosing and treating our children
    In 1987, only 3 percent of American children were diagnosed with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, also known as ADHD. By 2000, that number jumped to 7 percent, and in 2014 the number rose to an alarming 11 percent. To combat the disorder, two thirds of these children, some as young as three years old, are prescribed powerful stimulant drugs like Ritalin and Adderall to help them cope with symptoms. Meanwhile, ADHD rates have remained relatively low in other countries such as France, Finland, and the United Kingdom, and Japan, where the number of children diagnosed with and medicated for ADHD is a measly 1 percent or less.
    Alarmed by this trend, family therapist Marilyn Wedge set out to understand how ADHD became an American epidemic. If ADHD were a true biological disorder of the brain, why was the rate of diagnosis so much higher in America than it was abroad? Was a child's inattention or hyperactivity indicative of a genetic defect, or was it merely the expression of normal behavior or a reaction to stress? Most important, were there alternative treatments that could help children thrive without resorting to powerful prescription drugs? In an effort to answer these questions, Wedge published an article in Psychology Today entitled "Why French Kids Don't Have ADHD" in which she argued that different approaches to therapy, parenting, diet, and education may explain why rates of ADHD are so much lower in other countries.
    In A Disease Called Childhood, Wedge examines how myriad factors have come together, resulting in a generation addictied to stimulant drugs, and a medical system that encourages diagnosis instead of seeking other solutions. Writing with empathy and dogged determination to help parents and children struggling with an ADHD diagnosis, Wedge draws on her decades of experience, as well as up-to-date research, to offer a new perspective on ADHD. Instead of focusing only on treating symptoms, she looks at the various potential causes of hyperactivity and inattention in children and examines behavioral and environmental, as opposed to strictly biological, treatments that have been proven to help. In the process, Wedge offers parents, teachers, doctors, and therapists a new paradigm for child mental health--and a better, happier, and less medicated future for American children

  • An expats witty and insightful exploration of English and American cultural differences through the lensof language that will leave readers gobsmackedIn Thats Not English, the seemingly superficial differences between British and American English open the door to a deeper exploration of a historic and fascinating cultural divide. In each of the thirty chapters, Erin Moore explains a different word we use that says more about us than we think. For example, "Quite" exposes the tension between English reserve and American enthusiasm; in "Moreish," she addresses our snacking habits. In "Partner," she examines marriage equality; in "Pull," the theme is dating and sex; "Cheers" is about drinking; and "Knackered" covers how we raise our kids. The result is a cultural history in miniature and an expatriates survival guide.American by birth, Moore is a former book editor who specialized in spotting British booksincluding Eats, Shoots & Leavesfor the US market. Shes spent the last seven years living in England with her Anglo American husband and a small daughter with an English accent. Thats Not English is the perfect companion for modern Anglophiles and the ten million British and American travelers who visit one anothers countries each year.

  • The remarkable new novel in the Doc Ford series by New York Times–bestselling author Randy Wayne White.
    Doc Ford’s old friend, General Juan Garcia, has gone into the lucrative business of smuggling Cuban baseball players into the U.S. He is also feasting on profits made by buying historical treasures for pennies on the dollar. He prefers what dealers call HPC items--high-profile collectibles--but when he manages to obtain a collection of letters written by Fidel Castro between 1960–62 to a secret girlfriend, it’s not a matter of money anymore. Garcia has stumbled way out of his depth.
    First Garcia disappears, and then the man to whom he sold the letters. When Doc Ford begins to investigate, he soon becomes convinced that those letters contain a secret that someone, or some powerful agency, cannot allow to be made public.
    A lot happened between Cuba and the United States from 1960–62. Many men died. A few more will hardly be noticed.
    From the Hardcover edition.

  • Long-listed for the Baileys Women's Prize for Fiction, a lyrical novel set over the course of one morning in a small town in Pakistan
    Fatima Bhutto's stunning debut novel chronicles the lives of five young people trying to live and love in a world on fire. Set during the American invasion of Afghanistan, The Shadow of the Crescent Moon begins and ends one rain-swept Friday morning in Mir Ali, a small town in Pakistan's Tribal Areas close to the Afghan border.Three brothers meet for breakfast. Soon after, the eldest, Aman Erum, recently returned from America, hails a taxi to the local mosque. Sikandar, a doctor, drives to the hospital where he works, but must first stop to collect his troubled wife, who has not joined the family that morning. No one knows where Mina goes these days. Sikandar is exhausted by Mina's instability and by the pall of grief that has enveloped his family. But when, later in the morning, the two are taken hostage by members of the Taliban, Mina will prove to be stronger than anyone could have imagined.The youngest of the three leaves for town on a motorbike. An idealist, Hayat holds strong to his deathbed promise to their father--to free Mir Ali from oppressors. Seated behind him is a beautiful, fragile girl whose life and thoughts are overwhelmed by the war that has enveloped the place of her birth.Three hours later their day will end in devastating circumstances.In this beautifully observed novel, individuals are pushed to make terrible choices. And as the events of this single morning unfold, one woman is at the center of it all.
    Praise for The Shadow of the Crescent Moon
    "Bhutto writes of an extraordinary place where beauty lives alongside brutality, with superb poise and a kind of defiant lyricism." --The Times (UK)
    "[The Shadow of the Crescent Moon] is... a human story, with love as well as ideology - Bhutto blends the two adroitly (and) writes with great poignancy, keeping the emotional pitch high." --Financial Times

  • A spy story, a mystery, a father-son heartbreaker: Cyrus Copeland seeks the truth about his father, an American executive arrested in Iran for spying at the time of the 1979 hostage crisis, then put on trial for his life in a Revolutionary Court.
    As a young boy living in Tehran in 1979, Cyrus Copeland--child of an American father and Iranian mother--never dreamed that his dad, an employee of Westinghouse, would be in danger for his life. That is, until the moment his father was arrested on espionage charges and put on trial in a Revolutionary Court. Almost simultaneously, more than fifty other Americans were taken hostage at the U.S. Embassy by Islamist militants, an event that has recently captivated the world again with the success of the book and film Argo. With the hostage crisis receiving most of the attention from the media and White House, it was largely left to Copeland’s mother and family to negotiate his father’s reprieve from the firing squad. Now, more than thirty years later, Copeland sets out to find the truth about his father and his role in the Iranian hostage crisis. Was he in fact an intelligence operative--a weapons-system expert--caught red-handed by the Iranian regime, or was he innocent all along? Part mystery, part reportage, and part detective work, Copeland’s brilliantly original family epic is a powerful memoir and adventure.
    From the Hardcover edition.

  • #1 New York Times bestselling master of suspense Harlan Coben delivers his most shocking thriller yet, proving that a well-placed lie can help build a wonderful life--and a secret has the same explosive power to destroy it.
    The Stranger appears out of nowhere, perhaps in a bar, or a parking lot, or at the grocery store. His identity is unknown. His motives are unclear. His information is undeniable. Then he whispers a few words in your ear and disappears, leaving you picking up the pieces of your shattered world.
    Adam Price has a lot to lose: a comfortable marriage to a beautiful woman, two wonderful sons, and all the trappings of the American Dream: a big house, a good job, a seemingly perfect life.
    Then he runs into the Stranger. When he learns a devastating secret about his wife, Corinne, he confronts her, and the mirage of perfection disappears as if it never existed at all. Soon Adam finds himself tangled in something far darker than even Corinne’s deception, and realizes that if he doesn’t make exactly the right moves, the conspiracy he’s stumbled into will not only ruin lives--it will end them.
    From the Hardcover edition.

  • For the thousands of people who know nothing about wine and want to rectify that swiftly and painlessly, Mark Oldman?the ?Naked Chef? of wine?is here to help with the kind of information readers can use right now:
    ? Australian Shiraz is the most instantly likable red under $15
    ? Drink slightly sweet wine with spicy food
    ? Judge a wine shop by whether it has homemade shelf signs
    ? Don?t store unopened wine in the refrigerator for more than a week
    Loaded with his personal recommendations?including the top 100 wines less than $15?Oldman?s Guide also includes the wine picks of an eclectic mix of collectors, from Le Cirque owner Sirio Maccioni to Morley Safer of 60 Minutes. This is a wine guide like no other and is sure to be savored by anyone who wants their wine without the attitude.

  • More information to be announced soon on this forthcoming title from Penguin USA.

  • The #1 New York Times bestselling series. Lucas Davenport goes on a city-to-city search for a bizarre ritualistic killer. "Ice-pick chills...a double-pumped roundhouse of a thriller." --Kirkus Reviews

  • From the World Fantasy Award-winning author of The Bards of Bone Plain.
    The Wayfolk are a dark-haired, wandering people who shun doors and walls. Corleu is Wayfolk, albeit with hair the color of the moon. But when his companions and his own true love become trapped in an unearthly swamp beyond the reach of time, he dares to cross a forbidden and forbidding threshold, to enter a dark house that should not exist, to meet with a tinker who is also a king, and to embark on a quest for the one long-lost treasure that may free his people: the heart of the Cygnet.
    The Cygnet is a figure of myth and legend, like the Gold King, the Blind Lady, the Dancer, and the Warlock. Once Corleu had thought these beings to live only in the stars and in children's rhymes. Now he knows that they are as real as himself, and that it is the Cygnet that holds the others at bay.
    To find the heart, he must walk paths he never imagined: apprentice himself to a beautiful sorceress of uncertain motives, brave the Fire Bear in its lair, catch the Blood Fox by its shadow, and elude a valiant woman warrior whose destiny is strangely linked to his own. More, Corleu must also wrestle with his own conscience.
    For if he fails in his quest, those he loves are lost forever to timeless limbo. But if he claims the heart, then the Cygnet falls and so do all who live...

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