Littérature générale

  • This is the story of Alfred Hilroy, a recently widowed, 68-year-old man who believes that estate and money matters should be kept private. It is also the story of Alfred's three grown children, Bev, Michael, and Judy, who love their father dearly but worry that he is going to squander away his retirement savings - and their inheritance. Alfred believes his affairs are in order. He has part-time work at the pharmacy he co-owns and runs, reasonably good health, and a modest but steady amount of retirement income. However, he misses his late wife terribly and does not look forward to navigating through old age alone. Then "The Bolt" hits. Mary Beth Cain, twenty-five years Alfred's junior, is an athletic, confident, outgoing woman who knows what she wants. Within weeks there is talk of a future life together. Bev, Michael, and Judy are soon swept up into a sea of conflicting emotions as their new step-mother moves into - and redecorates - the beloved Hilroy home, appears at Alfred's birthday party wearing their late mother's spider brooch, and vacations with the family at the cottage. Will Alfred leave everything to this newcomer to the family? Will cherished family belongings suddenly disappear? The Hilroys' struggles are becoming more and more common as baby boomers confront their parents', and their own, mortality. As Bev, Michael, and Judy screw up their courage and begin discussions with their father about his estate, we learn about, Powers of Attorney, capital gains tax, probating a will, US estate and gift tax, trusts, joint ownership, cottage inheritances, communicating with aging people, and more - all in an intriguing, suspenseful, and ultimately liberating story.

  • Kid Rex is the story of one woman's struggle to overcome anorexia. After knowing other friends with anorexia and being baffled by their behavior (often wondering, "Why doesn't she just eat?!") Moisin suddenly found herself prone to the same disease, not eating at all and going weeks at a time taking in nothing but water and the occasional black coffee. She learns how to deceive the therapists her worried family sends her to, giving them all of the symptoms of depression so they'll misdiagnose her and let her continue to be anorexic.

    When she recognizes that she has a serious problem, though, she finally owns up to a therapist working at her university. She tells him that she's an anorexic who needs to go to some group meetings to work through her condition. He looks at her doubtfully and says, "No, I don't think you're an anorexic." All that runs through her mind is that she must be fat. Shortly after this devastating therapy visit, the Twin Towers fall in the September 11th attacks, and Moisin watches it happen from her apartment window. Her ensuing depression quickens her already dangerous downward spiral.

    Kid Rex is a book about hope, and looking to oneself and to those around you to help get out from under the hold of such a dreadful and powerful disease. This book is written for people who are also suffering from anorexia to let them know they're not alone, but Moisin never takes on a know-it-all tone. Books on anorexia that are currently available are either preachy, or more commonly, clinical accounts written by doctors, not people suffering from the disease.

    The book is also written for families and friends who find themselves unable to understand why their loved one won't just eat. When Moisin goes to a clinic and they plop down a tray of food in front of her, even the most sceptical reader will gasp and realize what an unsympathetic thing they've done to her. Moisin actually puts the reader into the head of someone suffering from anorexia, in beautiful and moving prose. The result is a book that is truly unforgettable.

  • Anglais Golden goa

    Grant Buday

    Rats, 16th century poets, and India on 3 bucks a day? Golden Goa recounts Grant Buday's travels in India by paralleling them with those of sixteenth-century Portuguese soldier and poet Luis de Camoens. Camoens, author of the Portuguese national epic The Lusiads, spent fourteen years in India in the 1500s. Between 1979 and 1999 Buday visited India five times in pursuit of the story of the Portuguese. A magical, exquisite narrative, reminiscent both of the travel writing of Paul Bowles and Michael Ondaatje's Running in the Family, this book takes you to the island of Diu, won by the Portuguese from the navy of Suleiman the Magnificent. Visiting Goa, Buday meets the Rodrigues family, people who inhabit a two-hundred-year-old house full of history and rats. (Goa was once the jewel in the crown of the Portuguese Empire, and the saying went that he who had seen Goa need not see Lisbon.) Throughout his journeys Buday encounters those who wish the Portuguese would come back - and those who are very glad they're gone. A comic, vivid, and moving story, Golden Goa takes you from Darjeeling in the east, to Jaisalmer in the west, to Cochin in the south. It explores Mother Teresa's Calcutta, the Dalai Lama's Dharamsala, and the Poona of Bhagwan Sri Rajneesh. Along the way, Buday is train wrecked, rat bit, badgered, and ripped off. Mostly, though, he's delighted.

  • The third best hull

    Lainie Cohen

    Hockey legend Gordie Howe once said there were two superstars in the Hull family: Bobby, the Golden Jet and one of the greatest players ever to tie up a pair of skates, and his brother Dennis, who had a solid career with the Chicago Blackhawks, and is now one of the most sought-after public speakers in North America. In The Third Best Hull. Dennis Hull outlines his life in hockey with humorous anecdotes, insights, and stories. Not just another sports autobiography, this book provides insight into the life of a hockey star without taking itself too seriously. You'll find out about the time Hull taught Guy Lafleur to speak English; how he once won a coin toss worth $250,000; and about his ongoing rivalry with Henri Richard, the younger brother of the legendary Canadiens' great Maurice Richard. Along the way, Dennis gives the reader an account of the famed 1972 Russia-Canada series and speaks with stunning candour about his brother, Bobby, his nephew and St. Louis Blues' star Brett Hull, and hockey legends like Howe, Ken Dryden, and Bobby Orr.

  • Anglais Gutted

    Evie Christie

    Gutted, Evie Christie's powerful and harrowing debut, pulses with the rhythms of life, loss, and love. Energized with the language of now and the wide scope of popular culture, while dwelling in Yeats' "foul rag and bone shop of the heart" - a world where needs are unfulfilled and passions unrequited (or worse) - it also manages to revel in the beauty of fragility and discover awe in the smallest things.

    Depictions of alcoholism and sex contrast with scenes of contented domesticity; questions of faith stand in counterpoint to the harsher realities of pornography and violence. Lovers, friends, family, and strangers play an equal part in shaping these sharply barbed observations, fleshing out the typically unseen and unspoken dramas of both small town and urban existence.

    From out of "an anarchy of conventional process" comes Evie Christie's stunning, original observations - because despite the searing and sometimes controversial themes, this is essentially love poetry - the kind that will leave your "heart plundered, hands lifted, gutted."

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