Livres en VO

  • Anglais Lost ate my life

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    ?"Lost Ate my Life!" is not the authors' self-referential statement. Instead, it is the collective cry of the hardened fan base for ABC's pop-culture phenomenon. The book has two central ideas: first, that the creators of Lost created a shift in the thinking of online communities, effectively removing the barrier between the artists and the patrons by hosting one of the largest officially sponsored independent discussion forums in history. Lost bloggers became important celebrities amongst the fan bases, some fans found themselves drawn into the inner circle, and the network began making decisions based on ebb and flow of fan sentiment.

    Interwoven with the story of the fandom is the examination of Lost's story itself: its archetypal themes, and its evolution from bordering on the high-concept 'cash in' it was intended to be, to the high art mixture of philosophy, drama, redemption, science, and faith. What is it in the formula of Lost that speaks to our collective unconscious so well that millions of fans are easily able to endure such mammoth leaps of suspension-of-disbelief?

    The book's story is told by two members of the fan community who witnessed the spread and impact of the fandom from the inside, eventually becoming insiders - to different degrees - themselves; one, Amy, deep within the inner sanctum of Lost labs, the other, Jon, ascending from the world of blogging to the world of professional media.

  • ?In the latest offering from the best-selling author of World Wrestling Insanity, James Guttman tells the real story behind contacting, cajoling, convincing, interviewing, and learning from more than 100 of professional wrestling's most beloved stars. From former World Champions to Playboy models, from grizzled veterans to slick promoters, Radio Free Insanity, Guttman's popular and groundbreaking weekly web broadcast has featured an environment that fosters discussion and leads to countless memorable tales.

    In Shoot First? Ask Questions Later you'll journey with Guttman through the business of sports entertainment, making startling discoveries about the way the industry truly works. For the first time ever, Guttman offers keen insight into the true personalities of wrestling's stars.

    Who's the nicest guest off-air? And who was the most abrasive? Who was the funniest? And who was the worst interview in the history of interviews? What's the bizarre story behind speaking with Scott Steiner, and why was Guttman worried? Why was Corporal Kirschner answering JG's phone? What's the inside scoop on the now infamous Ole Anderson shoot? What were crazy pre-interview conversations with people like Jerry Lawler, Diamond Dallas Page, Juvi "The Juice" Guerrera, and others really like? Discover all this and more from James Guttman's two years behind the curtain and inside the work/shoot world of professional wrestling.

    Shoot First ? Ask Questions Later, with over 100 names you've come to know and love and sometimes hate, comes from the outsider who makes it his mission to find out what makes them tick.

  • The decline and fall of the Montreal Expos. In 1969, the Montreal Expos played their first game. Thirty-two years later, the team that once boasted baseball's best farm system is nearly dead. In this book, former Expos president Claude Brochu gets to the bottom of the Expos' story. From his successful marketing career at Seagram's, Claude Brochu was thrust into the role of Expos president in 1986. Back then, the Expos were a team with terrific potential. But as the years went by, attendance began to slide. Whenever owner Charles Bronfman attended a game he would shake his head, discouraged: "Why don't they come? What do we have to do?" The answer - field a winning team - seemed so simple, yet so elusive.
    And then, after 21 years, Bronfman decided to sell the team. He entrusted the sale to Brochu, who took up the gauntlet: "I made it a personal challenge. Businessmen are often portrayed as cold, emotionless people, who make decisions only on the eventual possibility of making a lot of money.? But that's not it at all. What fascinated me, what motivated me, was keeping the Expos in Montreal, in the hands of Quebecers. One of them being me.?"

  • The first in-depth look at one of today's fastest rising stars! Natalie Portman is only 20 years old, but already she has co-starred in nine motion pictures with everyone from Woody Allen to Al Pacino to Julia Roberts. Critics in the know consider her the best young actress in America.
    Dickerson's engaging biography examines the charm and wit of Portman's professional persona, while revealing the emotional life of the real Portman. From her relationship with her successful - and demanding - parents, to her modeling career and her early acting roles, from her life at Harvard to her breathtaking performance in Star Wars, Dickerson illuminates Portman's influences and ambitious dreams.
    The biography discusses Natalie's long relationship with Britney Spears and their parallel, albeit drastically different, careers. It also goes behind-the-scenes of Natalie's successes - Star Wars, The Professional - and her failures - the screen kiss with Leonardo DiCaprio that caused producers to drop her from the cast of Luhrmann's Romeo + Juliet. Dickerson speaks with Portman's Harvard classmates, revealing the intrigue that surrounded her arrival at the prestigious university. The intimate details of Natalie Portman's life have always been closely guarded secrets. Dickerson also delves into her personal life and tells the story that, until now, has not been told.

  • When the world thinks of heavy metal in its pure, potent, undiluted form, it is none other than the Metal Gods, Judas Priest, that instantly come to mind. Chrome and black leather, studs and whips and chains, a chopper on stage ? these are the tools of the trade for Rob Halford and his legendary band of Birmingham bashers. Back stronger than ever, Judas Priest, in 2005, issued their acclaimed Angel of Retribution album. It is long overdue that their story be told.

    Published to coincide with a new album in fall 2007, Martin Popoff's book, Judas Priest: Heavy Metal Painkillers, examines the band's rich legacy album by album, anthem by anthem, recounting the band's shocking split with Halford in the mid '90s and his triumphant return in 2003. Having interviewed all the principals in the band repeatedly over the years, Popoff gives a firsthand account of the Priest's rocky, often comical ride through the '70s, through the gold and platinum records of the '80s, detailing the long road back to the status the band now enjoys as heavy metal's proudest ambassadors. Accompanying Popoff's lively text are more than 500 full-colour images, the band's gleaming steel imagery springing to life through a myriad of photos from the stage, memorabilia shots, cover graphics, and all manner of Priestly feast for the electric eye.

  • "They need to think big like I did. If they can see it in their head, they can get there." Thinkin Big is the story of a kid whose dream was never supposed to come true: the story of a man who won hearts with his gentleness, but whose fearlessness was legendary. It is the biography of a champion once broken by boxing.
    As he watched Cassius Clay destroy Sonny Liston on February 25, 1964, James Tillis was told by God he would be a professional fighter. Thirty-three years later, James "Quick" Tillis, dubbed the Fightin Cowboy by Muhammad Ali, would record his story in a dimly lit jail cell. He was a young black athlete who'd clung to his alcoholic father and his religious mother, rising to battle seven heavyweight champions.
    But this naive heavyweight would be sacrificed by the sport he loved; it would rob him of the women he loved, his dignity, his fortune, and his title. He crawled into the ring 64 times to prove that he could win, but one dirty agent was determined to bleed him dry. Now he tells a story like no fighter before. It's raw, yet full of humour, told from a legend's perspective.

  • Anglais The real made up

    Stephen Brockwell

    From the moment we learn to speak we are always using other people's words. the real made up improvises on this simple idea of imitation; mimicry becomes a kind of cadence for an interweaving of transcribed speech, ironic song, jarring randomization, post-colonial irony, and blatant theft. An incessant imitative dialogue shapes our neural and cultural networks; imitation is a source of power for any subculture, and the primary means of a colonizing process that should be seen as violent. But imitation is not a simple act of copying; at its best, imitation is accompanied by play, performance, and re-enactment. Imitation is a crucial human faculty - a talent at the heart of social being. The primal emotions of love, hate, desire, and anger find their expression in speech and action that are by nature imitative. the real made up is itself made up of real and imaginary interviews with people off the street, of poems by others and poems from others (including much imitated members of the Can Lit canon like Al Purdy, Irving Layton and Erin Mouré). Every poem in the real made up is an attempt to revel in or escape from - an impossible task - the imitative traces of everyone else.

  • Mobsters, murder, betrayal, and revenge are the raw components of this candid look into the day-to-day life of a modern-day marijuana smuggler. Told from the viewpoint of an impressionable young entrepreneur named Jay Carter Brown, the book quickly draws the reader into the gritty underbelly of the international drug trade.

    The story begins with minor-league smuggling scams between Canada and the Caribbean that soon escalate to multi-ton shipments of grass and hash from the Caribbean and the Middle East. All goes well for a time, but as the stakes grow higher, the inevitable setbacks occur.

    When Jay teams up with a crusty old bank robber named Irving, he also inherits a host of other felons who come out of jail to visit his new partner, ex-cons such as: Randy the hit man who liked to practise his fast draw in front of a mirror; Simon, the drug-running pilot; and Chico Perry, who smoked reefer in his pipe while robbing banks and shooting it out with the cops.

    Drug-runners, police, jealous friends, and rival gangs all contribute to this extraordinary story told by a young man who became involved at the highest levels of the drug trade, and lived to tell about it. Smuggler's Blues is a rare opportunity to experience life in another world - a world where survival relies on brains, brawn, and a generous measure of good luck.

  • Anglais Golden goa

    Grant Buday

    Rats, 16th century poets, and India on 3 bucks a day? Golden Goa recounts Grant Buday's travels in India by paralleling them with those of sixteenth-century Portuguese soldier and poet Luis de Camoens. Camoens, author of the Portuguese national epic The Lusiads, spent fourteen years in India in the 1500s. Between 1979 and 1999 Buday visited India five times in pursuit of the story of the Portuguese. A magical, exquisite narrative, reminiscent both of the travel writing of Paul Bowles and Michael Ondaatje's Running in the Family, this book takes you to the island of Diu, won by the Portuguese from the navy of Suleiman the Magnificent. Visiting Goa, Buday meets the Rodrigues family, people who inhabit a two-hundred-year-old house full of history and rats. (Goa was once the jewel in the crown of the Portuguese Empire, and the saying went that he who had seen Goa need not see Lisbon.) Throughout his journeys Buday encounters those who wish the Portuguese would come back - and those who are very glad they're gone. A comic, vivid, and moving story, Golden Goa takes you from Darjeeling in the east, to Jaisalmer in the west, to Cochin in the south. It explores Mother Teresa's Calcutta, the Dalai Lama's Dharamsala, and the Poona of Bhagwan Sri Rajneesh. Along the way, Buday is train wrecked, rat bit, badgered, and ripped off. Mostly, though, he's delighted.

  • Anglais Gutted

    Evie Christie

    Gutted, Evie Christie's powerful and harrowing debut, pulses with the rhythms of life, loss, and love. Energized with the language of now and the wide scope of popular culture, while dwelling in Yeats' "foul rag and bone shop of the heart" - a world where needs are unfulfilled and passions unrequited (or worse) - it also manages to revel in the beauty of fragility and discover awe in the smallest things.

    Depictions of alcoholism and sex contrast with scenes of contented domesticity; questions of faith stand in counterpoint to the harsher realities of pornography and violence. Lovers, friends, family, and strangers play an equal part in shaping these sharply barbed observations, fleshing out the typically unseen and unspoken dramas of both small town and urban existence.

    From out of "an anarchy of conventional process" comes Evie Christie's stunning, original observations - because despite the searing and sometimes controversial themes, this is essentially love poetry - the kind that will leave your "heart plundered, hands lifted, gutted."

  • Anglais World wrestling insanity

    James Guttman

    In an industry where nothing is real and no one actually wins or loses, the possibilities for manipulation are endless. World Wrestling Insanity sets out to expose the nepotism, backwards logic, and power plays that have made World Wrestling Entertainment go round. Alongside many well known names in wrestling, author James Guttman uses sarcasm, humour, and facts to break down the secrets of Vince McMahon's company and analyze the reasoning behind many of the decisions made. Never before has WWE, the McMahon Family, Triple H, and others been held up to the light and examined so closely. Why are some of the shows written as they are? Who has the company's best interests at heart? Who has their own best interests at heart? Could the WWE's errors be nothing more than accidents or are they the product of cold and calculated manipulation?

    In his trademark style, James Guttman analyzes the insanity and breaks down the McMahonifaction of pro wrestling. You better get your copy soon. Something tells us that there's a family in Connecticut who would like to make sure that James's first book is his last one.

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