Sky Gilbert

  • Kissing and telling ? You've heard about Sky Gilbert: he's loved by fans of his novels, plays, poetry, and columns; hated by the Toronto Sun and by some members of the gay community. His alter ego Jane, a drag queen, was charged with not wearing a seat belt in a cab, took the case to trial, and won: "The judge said I was a reasonable person." Gilbert's theatre, Buddies in Bad Times, was almost closed by The City of Toronto for sponsoring S/M workshops in 1990, and yet he was awarded the Pauline McGibbon Award for directing in 1985, has directed two plays at the Shaw Festival, and had his work performed across North America. The Religious Right has campaigned against him, yet some men argue that his work has changed their lives. So, what's Gilbert all about, what makes him tick? Is he a drag queen? An award-winning artist? A complete slut? Or, maybe, all three? Many are going to be angered by this book, many more will be entertained. One guarantee: everyone is going to be reading Ejaculations from the Charm Factory to see if their names are in it. And yes, they are.? But there's also a whole lot more.

  • It's difficult to describe A Nice Place to Visit. Some will say it's not a book of poetry at all - but that's just because it's funny and has reviews of bad movies and advice on things like love. Also, it's a kind of travelogue: you get to go to Costa Rica and look at plants and and stuff and think more about love. And oh yeah, the book tells you who not to sleep with - that's very important. And have you ever heard of John Wildman, the guy who starred in the Canadian hit movie My American Cousin? Well, there's an ode to him. There are memorable lines like "Lois and Fran gave me a frying pan." (But you probably won't like it if you haven't heard of Parker Posey. You have heard of Parker Posey, right?) Mostly it's about things you'll always remember - like that summer when the boys in Montreal were all wearing underwear that said "Home Of The Brave." You know . . . It's a nice place to visit - but I wouldn't want to live there.

  • Rope Opera

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    It's been a decade since The Monday Night War waged between the WWF and WCW generated unprecedented and astronomical ratings, and the landscape of "the sport of kings" has changed radically. But one thing remains constant: the fans chanting "Fire Russo!" can still be heard at TV tapings and pay-per-view events across North America. And Vince Russo, the man who has at times been called "the most hated man in professional wrestling" wouldn't have it any other way.

    In his first book, Forgiven, Vince Russo delivered a modern-day parable about the price of success. In heartbreaking detail, he showed how a "godforsaken business" and the desire for acclaim in his career as a writer for Vince McMahon's WWF led him into a spiritual wasteland.

    Today, a changed Russo has returned to prominence in wrestling - a world he both loves and that has, he acknowledges, broken his heart - as one of the writers and masterminds behind TNA, the world's fastest-growing and most cutting-edge wrestling promotion. For two hours every Thursday, Russo's ideas and words revolutionize wrestling on Spike TV; but what he achieves on Impact! on a weekly basis has been many years in the making. He's been known as both the saviour of the WWF and the man who destroyed WCW, and Rope Opera: How WCW Killed Vince Russo is the true, behind-the-scenes story of, quite simply, the rise and fall and rebirth of professional wrestling.

    Many have tried to explain the inner workings of wrestling's most turbulent era - but this is the first time someone in the centre of the maelstrom has ever laid everything bare. In returning to the page to take readers from the death of WCW to the rise of TNA, Vince Russo has crafted his most remarkable storyline: that a grown man can come to terms with, and find peace within, the insanity of the squared circle.

  • Neil Peart's travel memoir of thoughts, observations, and experiences as he cycles through West Africa, reveals the subtle, yet powerful writing style that has made him one of rock's greatest lyricists. As he describes his extraordinary journey and his experiences - from the pains of dysentery, to a confrontation with an armed soldier, to navigating dirt roads off the beaten path - he reveals his own emotional landscape, and along the way, the different "masks" that he discovers he wears.

    "Cycling is a good way to travel anywhere, but especially in Africa. You are independent and mobile, and yet travel at people speed - fast enough to travel on to another town in the cooler morning hours, but slow enough to meet people: the old farmer at the roadside who raises his hand and says, 'You are welcome,' the tireless women who offer a smile to a passing cyclist, the children whose laughter transcends the humblest home."

  • The first book in the critically acclaimed, bestselling Finding Lost series brings you an analysis of seasons 1 and 2 in one volume.

    If you're feeling as lost as the castaways on the show, Finding Lost is the crucial companion guide to help you unravel the mysteries of the island. This is the only book that offers an episode-by-episode guide to the first two seasons of Lost, following the developments of the characters, the plots, and the various connections fans must make to keep up. Finding Lost includes:

    * an in-depth look at every episode, with highlights, music, and nitpicks outlined at the end of each one
    * chapters on the real John Locke and Jean-Jacques Rousseau (and how they compare to the fictional ones), fan conspiracy theories, the blast door map, the Dharma symbol, and B.F. Skinner
    * sidebars chronicling fun trivia such as Sawyer's nicknames for people; what Hurley's numbers could mean; Vincent's mysterious appearances and disappearances; the redemption of the characters
    * bios for all of the major actors on the show
    * summaries of the show's literary references, including Lord of the Flies, The Third Policeman, Our Mutual Friend, Watership Down, and many more
    * photos of the filming locations in Hawaii, including a detailed map of how to conduct your own tour when in Oahu

    Full of exclusive photos and enough background to put you leagues ahead of other viewers, this book will finally help you "find" Lost.

  • ?Brother Dumb is the memoir of a reclusive American literary icon. Brother Dumb is a how-to manual for meaningful critical engagement with the real world. Brother Dumb is a celebration of innocence, youth, and altruism. Brother Dumb is a true story of self-imposed exile. . . .

    Brother Dumb is also a work of fiction.

    Brother Dumb begins in the mid-40s, but spans decades, delving deep into the five tortured relationships that have shaped one writer's psycho-sexual history - but it also details his bitter literary decline and withdrawal from public life. Brother Dumb is a misanthrope. His withdrawal from the world is as famous, or infamous, as his writing - something that he takes great pains to explain is not a desperate cry for attention.

    Attention is the last thing Brother Dumb wants.

    So why publish this memoir? Why expose himself to a world of stupid, lecherous, greedy, evil, and calculating people?

    Because he can't not write. And because, somewhere out there, a kindred soul might actually be reading. . . .

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