Sky Gilbert

  • Neil Peart's travel memoir of thoughts, observations, and experiences as he cycles through West Africa, reveals the subtle, yet powerful writing style that has made him one of rock's greatest lyricists. As he describes his extraordinary journey and his experiences - from the pains of dysentery, to a confrontation with an armed soldier, to navigating dirt roads off the beaten path - he reveals his own emotional landscape, and along the way, the different "masks" that he discovers he wears.

    "Cycling is a good way to travel anywhere, but especially in Africa. You are independent and mobile, and yet travel at people speed - fast enough to travel on to another town in the cooler morning hours, but slow enough to meet people: the old farmer at the roadside who raises his hand and says, 'You are welcome,' the tireless women who offer a smile to a passing cyclist, the children whose laughter transcends the humblest home."

  • The first book in the critically acclaimed, bestselling Finding Lost series brings you an analysis of seasons 1 and 2 in one volume.

    If you're feeling as lost as the castaways on the show, Finding Lost is the crucial companion guide to help you unravel the mysteries of the island. This is the only book that offers an episode-by-episode guide to the first two seasons of Lost, following the developments of the characters, the plots, and the various connections fans must make to keep up. Finding Lost includes:

    * an in-depth look at every episode, with highlights, music, and nitpicks outlined at the end of each one
    * chapters on the real John Locke and Jean-Jacques Rousseau (and how they compare to the fictional ones), fan conspiracy theories, the blast door map, the Dharma symbol, and B.F. Skinner
    * sidebars chronicling fun trivia such as Sawyer's nicknames for people; what Hurley's numbers could mean; Vincent's mysterious appearances and disappearances; the redemption of the characters
    * bios for all of the major actors on the show
    * summaries of the show's literary references, including Lord of the Flies, The Third Policeman, Our Mutual Friend, Watership Down, and many more
    * photos of the filming locations in Hawaii, including a detailed map of how to conduct your own tour when in Oahu

    Full of exclusive photos and enough background to put you leagues ahead of other viewers, this book will finally help you "find" Lost.

  • ?Brother Dumb is the memoir of a reclusive American literary icon. Brother Dumb is a how-to manual for meaningful critical engagement with the real world. Brother Dumb is a celebration of innocence, youth, and altruism. Brother Dumb is a true story of self-imposed exile. . . .

    Brother Dumb is also a work of fiction.

    Brother Dumb begins in the mid-40s, but spans decades, delving deep into the five tortured relationships that have shaped one writer's psycho-sexual history - but it also details his bitter literary decline and withdrawal from public life. Brother Dumb is a misanthrope. His withdrawal from the world is as famous, or infamous, as his writing - something that he takes great pains to explain is not a desperate cry for attention.

    Attention is the last thing Brother Dumb wants.

    So why publish this memoir? Why expose himself to a world of stupid, lecherous, greedy, evil, and calculating people?

    Because he can't not write. And because, somewhere out there, a kindred soul might actually be reading. . . .

  • Detectives Price and McKeon are called to the scene - a husband and wife found slumped in their car, parked sideways on a busy downtown on-ramp, a bullet in each of their heads. That's what's in the papers, and that's all the public sees. Toronto the Good, with occasional specks of random badness.

    But behind that disposable headline, Toronto's shadow city sprawls outwards, a grasping and vicious economy of drugs, guns, sex, and gold bullion. And that shadow city feels just like home for Get - a Detroit boy, project-raised, ex-army, Iraq and Afghanistan, only signed up for the business opportunities, plenty of them over there. Now he's back, and he's been sent up here by his family to sell guns to Toronto's fast-rising biker gangs, maybe even see about a partnership.

    The man Get needs to talk to is Nugs, leader of the Saints of Hell. Nugs is overseeing unprecedented progress, taking the club national, uniting bikers coast-to-coast (by force if necessary), pushing back against the Italians, and introducing a veneer of respectability. Beards trimmed to goatees, golf shirts instead of leather jackets, and SUVs replacing the bikes. And now the cops can't tell the difference between bikers and bankers.

    Detectives Price and McKeon? All they can do is watch and grimace and drink, and sweep up the detritus left in crime's wake - dead hookers, cops corrupted and discarded, anyone else too slow and weak to keep up, or too stupid not to get out of the way. This is Toronto's shadow city, and you won't recognize it.

    "Canada's answer to Elmore Leonard is going places . . ."
    - Toronto Star

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