Sarah Clarke Stuart

  • Offering a holistic approach to television criticism, this analytical companion to the popular show Fringe examines the drama's mythology and unveils its mysteries while exposing significant cultural issues addressed in each episode.

    With a strong basis in science fiction, Fringe has all of the archetypal characters and themes of the genre, from the covert mastermind and the mad scientist to dangerous advances in technology, parallel worlds, and man-made monsters. Along with many other post-9/11 television shows aired in the West, Fringe has demonstrated a society's collective paranoia about foreign invaders, on the one hand, and domestic corruption on the other. It also lays bare the fear of radical advances in technology and urges its viewers to ponder the ethical limitations of science. This guide explores how the show uses these elements to tap into a deeper understanding of the human experience.

    Less focused on individual episodes, this book is split into three parts, each discussing a broad element of the narrative experience of the first three seasons of this multilayered show.

  • Comprised of all-new, exclusive interviews with Jets players, head coaches, and those closest to the organization, Sack Exchange is not only an eye-opening account of the Jets from this time, but also of the National Football League as a whole.

    The New York Sack Exchange was the nickname given to the New York Jets defensive line of the early 1980s, consisting of Mark Gastineau, Joe Klecko, Marty Lyons, and Abdul Salaam.

    Examined are such topics as the beginning of the Jets-Dolphons rivalry, the controversial firing of head coach Walt Michaels and hiring of Joe Walton, the team's relationships behind the scenes, the emergence of Joe Klecko, the rise and fall of Mark Gastineau, steroid use among the Jets and in the NFL, the legendary Shea Stadium as well as never-before-heard stories and insight into the legacy of Joe Namath.

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