Jonathan Bennett

  • The Act Itself offers a deeper understanding of what is going on in our own moral thoughts about human behaviour. Many of the descriptions of behaviour on which our moral thoughts are based are confused; others may be free of confusion, but still we are not clear in our minds about what thoughts they are. That is would hurt her, it would be disloyal, it wouldn't be done with that intention, it would be dangerous, it would
    involve allowing harm but not producing it--thoughts like these support our moral judgements and thus guide our lives. In so far as we do not deeply understand them, this is a kind of servitude. As Locke said, 'He is the most enslaved who is so in his understanding.' Jonathan Bennett presents conceptual analysis as a means to getting more
    control of our thoughts and thus of our lives.

  • Entitlement

    ,

    Entitlement is the tragic, wrenching story of Andy Kronk. After a lifetime intertwined with the Aspinalls, one of Canada's wealthiest families, Andy has finally forged a clean break. Mere months pass, however, before his past returns, and he finds himself, obediently, digging ?

    At its heart, Entitlement is a story about identity - about who we think we are and where we really stand. Set in rural Ontario and with excursions to Toronto and New York City, the novel takes a provocative and honest look at class, power, male relationships, death, and the familial bonds that tie, protect and harm us most.

    Andy's story is revealed to Trudy Clarke. Writing an Aspinall "tell-all" biography, she wants Kronk's take for her book. Reluctantly, Andy agrees to talk. He begins by explaining that when he quit practising law, all he wanted was a clean start and the privacy to live life on his own terms. But, as he explains over the course of a weekend interview, his boyhood boarding school entanglement with one of Canada's elite families became complicated - and remains strong. As the weekend progresses, Andy grows comfortable. When he realizes that he's gone too far, said too much, it's too late?

    Written in forceful prose, with a poet's ear, Jonathan Bennett's Entitlement does for the world of power and privilege what David Adams Richards has done for the hardscrabble blue collar men and women of his award-winning novels - tearing down myths to reveal something essentially, and always, heartbreakingly human.

  • ?"As accomplished as Jonathan Bennett is at using language, he's never fussy or precious about it. With his exacting, contemporary voice, part colourful reporter, part reluctant witness, his lines gain their effect by serving experience in the most necessary way possible, via clear-eyed attention and vivid diction. The result is an immediacy often lacking in other poetry. Civil and Civic's nimble narratives will crackle in your ear."
    - David O'Meara, author of Noble Gas, Penny Black

    The poems of Jonathan Bennett's second collection, Civil and Civic, probe for present meanings of civility and civic mindedness, search for boundaries between private and public realms, and question the sprawling and often unintended effects of transparency and obligation. Medicine, the military, science, public relations, social justice, media, business, and the environmental movement are just some of the worlds these poems inhabit.

    Not without a spirit of play, in Civil and Civic Bennett emerges as a disquieting curator, giving the reader poetry that is relevant, humane, political, investigative, and outward looking. Yet, within which, he supplies voice to private moments, isolated or suppressed incidents, and to the happy accidents that can occur within language when irreconcilable spheres of influence meet and open up new meanings, ideas, hope even.

  • One of the most iconic villains in the history of television, the enigmatic Cigarette Smoking Man fascinated legions of fans of the 1990s' hit TV series, The X-Files. Best known as "Cancerman," he was voted Television's Favourite Villain by the readers of TV Guide. The man behind the villain, William B. Davis, is a Canadian actor and director, whose revelations in this memoir will entertain and intrigue the millions of X-Files aficionados worldwide.

    But there is more to Davis's story than just The X-Files.

    Davis's extensive acting experience began when he was a child in Ontario in the 1950s, and grew to encompass radio, theatre, film, and television. At the University of Toronto, where he graduated with a degree in philosophy, he turned his hand to directing, a move that took him to theatre school in Britain and a directing career. There, he reconnected with his undergraduate colleague, Donald Sutherland, and worked at the National Theatre, with such notables as Sir Laurence Olivier, Dame Maggie Smith, and Albert Finney.

    Those who love the theatre will delight in his recollections of the Straw Hat Players in Ontario or the trials and tribulations of an artistic director of repertory theatre in Dundee, Scotland, or his valiant attempt to create a theatre in Quebec devoted to the Canadian repertoire. Those who love history will relive with Davis those "golden years" of Canadian radio drama and theatre, not to mention enjoying an inside look at the National Theatre School of Canada where he directed the English Acting Program in the '60s. Those who love a bit of scandalous gossip will not be disappointed.

    Written in an easy conversational style, this memoir truly is "The Musings of the Cigarette Smoking Man" - as William B. Davis reflects on his loves, his losses, his hopes, his fears, and his accomplishments in this unique and engaging autobiography.

empty