Jason Schneider

  • 3,000 Miles

    Jason Schneider

    Nirvana's Kurt Cobain could not have envisioned what his death would mean to Generation X - or that he would influence one young man from small-town Quebec to take his own life . . .

    3,000 Miles is the story of Andre, a man entering his twenties with very little going for him. The only stabilizing influence in his life is music, but the news of Kurt Cobain's suicide finally pushes him over the edge. He leaves town and joins his friends Richard and Stephane in Quebec City to sell drugs. Eventually, the reserves of his self-centred nihilism run dry, and this prompts him to devise a plan: the trio will embark on a journey across North America. When they reach the end-Seattle-they'll sacrifice themselves.

    Andre's problem, of course, is convincing his friends to join him, but they decide to call his bluff. Their own young lives are in constant turmoil, and a road trip seems like the perfect distraction. But things quickly move from bad to worse when Andre's spurned girlfriend, Sylvie, makes her own cross-country journey in a last-ditch attempt to prove her love.

    If Kerouac's On The Road mapped the landscape of a new America, 3,000 Miles explores its ultimate dead end.

  • Wilson spent his entire life under the radar. Few people knew who he was and even less knew how to find him. Only two people even knew what he really did. He worked jobs for one very bad man. Illegal jobs no one could ever know about. Wilson was invisible until the day he crossed the line and risked everything to save the last connection to humanity he had. One day changed everything. Wilson saved his friends and earned the hatred of a vengeful mob boss, a man who claimed he was Charles Darwin's worst nightmare.

    Wilson survived his transgression and went even deeper into the underworld of Hamilton becoming a ghost in the city - an unknown to almost everyone until he was paid back for his one good deed. It started with a simple job. Steal a bag from the airport and hand it off. No one said what was in the bag, and no one mentioned who the real owners were or what they would do to get it back. One bag sets into motion a violent chain of events from which no one will escape untouched. Wilson learns that no one forgets, no one gets away clean, and no good deed goes unpunished.

  • Secret? Providence & Newport is a new travel book that reveals the best-kept secrets of two cities steeped in American history. Providence's consuming passion is food. One of the most prestigious training grounds for American chefs - Johnson and Wales - is in Downcity (Providence's term for downtown). After a succulent dinner at one of the city's charming little restaurants, visit the garden where Edgar Allan Poe courted and won the heart of Sarah Whitman, or find hidden places to have a picnic and enjoy the flowers.
    Newport's past and present are quite different from those of Providence. A great colonial seaport, it was a major stop on the northern tip of the deadly - but profitable - Triangle Trade. During the Revolution, the city was occupied by the British, who left a set of vaulted brick barracks that most Newporters don't even know exist. But for all its fascinating colonial history, Newport carved its niche as the summer home of Gilded Age society. Few people have seen the views from the rooftop of a Bellevue Avenue palace but you might be able to with the help of this guide.
    Secret? Providence/Newport is one of a unique series of in-depth guidebooks that take you off the tired track of mainstream tourism. This guide is a gem for anyone eager to discover the unconventional.

  • Whispering Pines is the first comprehensive history of Canada's immense songwriting legacy, from Gordon Lightfoot to Joni Mitchell.

    Canadian songwriters have always struggled to create work that reflects the environment in which they were raised, while simultaneously connecting with a mass audience. For most of the 20th century, that audience lay outside Canada, making the challenge that much greater. While nearly every songwriter who successfully crossed this divide did so by immersing themselves in the American and British forms of blues, folk, country, and their bastard offspring, rock and roll, traces of Canadian sensibilities were never far beneath the surface of the eventual end product.

    What were these sensibilities, and why did they transfer so well outside Canada? With each passing decade, a clear picture eventually emerged of what Canadian songwriters were contributing to popular music, and subsequently passing on to fellow artists, both within Canada and around the world. Just as Hank Snow became a giant in country music, Ian & Sylvia and Gordon Lightfoot became crucial components of the folk revival. In the folk-rock boom that followed in the late '60s, songs by The Band and Leonard Cohen were instant standards, while during the '70s singer/songwriter movement few artists were more revered than Neil Young and Joni Mitchell.

    This is the first thorough exploration of how these, along with other lesser-known but no less significant, artists came to establish a distinct Canadian musical identity from the 1930s to the end of the 1970s. Anecdotes explaining the personal and creative connections that many of the artists shared comprise a large aspect of the storytelling, along with first-person interviews and extensive research. The emphasis is on the essential music - how and where it originated, and what impact it eventually had on both the artists' subsequent work, and the wider musical world.

  • Fans of offbeat cinema, discriminating renters and collectors, and movie buffs will drool over this checklist of the best overlooked and underappreciated films of the last 100 years. In Son of the 100 Best Movies You've Never Seen, Richard Crouse, Canada AM film critic and host of television's award-winning Reel to Real, presents a follow-up to his 2003 book with another 100 of his favorite films.

    Titles range from the obscure, like 1912's The Cameraman's Revenge, to El Topo's unusual existential remake of the classic western, and little-seen classics like The Killing. Each essay features a detailed description of plot, notable trivia tidbits, critical reviews, and interviews with actors and filmmakers. Featured interviews include Billy Bob Thornton on an inspirational movie about a man with his head in the clouds, Francis Ford Coppola on One from the Heart, and Mario Van Peebles on playing his own father in Badasssss!

    Sidebars feature quirky details, including legal disclaimers and memorable quotes, along with movie picks from A-list actors and directors.

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