Langue française

  • Offering a holistic approach to television criticism, this analytical companion to the popular show Fringe examines the drama's mythology and unveils its mysteries while exposing significant cultural issues addressed in each episode.

    With a strong basis in science fiction, Fringe has all of the archetypal characters and themes of the genre, from the covert mastermind and the mad scientist to dangerous advances in technology, parallel worlds, and man-made monsters. Along with many other post-9/11 television shows aired in the West, Fringe has demonstrated a society's collective paranoia about foreign invaders, on the one hand, and domestic corruption on the other. It also lays bare the fear of radical advances in technology and urges its viewers to ponder the ethical limitations of science. This guide explores how the show uses these elements to tap into a deeper understanding of the human experience.

    Less focused on individual episodes, this book is split into three parts, each discussing a broad element of the narrative experience of the first three seasons of this multilayered show.

  • One of the most iconic villains in the history of television, the enigmatic Cigarette Smoking Man fascinated legions of fans of the 1990s' hit TV series, The X-Files. Best known as "Cancerman," he was voted Television's Favourite Villain by the readers of TV Guide. The man behind the villain, William B. Davis, is a Canadian actor and director, whose revelations in this memoir will entertain and intrigue the millions of X-Files aficionados worldwide.

    But there is more to Davis's story than just The X-Files.

    Davis's extensive acting experience began when he was a child in Ontario in the 1950s, and grew to encompass radio, theatre, film, and television. At the University of Toronto, where he graduated with a degree in philosophy, he turned his hand to directing, a move that took him to theatre school in Britain and a directing career. There, he reconnected with his undergraduate colleague, Donald Sutherland, and worked at the National Theatre, with such notables as Sir Laurence Olivier, Dame Maggie Smith, and Albert Finney.

    Those who love the theatre will delight in his recollections of the Straw Hat Players in Ontario or the trials and tribulations of an artistic director of repertory theatre in Dundee, Scotland, or his valiant attempt to create a theatre in Quebec devoted to the Canadian repertoire. Those who love history will relive with Davis those "golden years" of Canadian radio drama and theatre, not to mention enjoying an inside look at the National Theatre School of Canada where he directed the English Acting Program in the '60s. Those who love a bit of scandalous gossip will not be disappointed.

    Written in an easy conversational style, this memoir truly is "The Musings of the Cigarette Smoking Man" - as William B. Davis reflects on his loves, his losses, his hopes, his fears, and his accomplishments in this unique and engaging autobiography.

  • ?We look away from his open mouth,
    look instead at the corn, the crows
    floating above the river in their private worries.
    Tonight, when we turn in,
    the candle will sputter and blow.
    Pinched out easily, all flame
    gives way to this wide black wing.
    - excerpt from "Black Wing"

    The poems in Ashland, originally published by ECW in 2003, lay the groundwork for Adamson's award-winning and internationally bestselling novel, The Outlander.

    Neogothicism, the surrealist snapshot, feminist Western and postmodern parable are just some of the elements that feed Gil Adamson's second collection of poems. Adamson creates a world fully awash in violence and history, the absurdities of the frontier, the gorgeous terrors of death. Everything is simple, and yet nothing is as it seems.

    Moving easily from prose poem to lyric, verbal portrait to improbable biography, Ashland leads us on a macabre tour of our nightmares, perverse secrets, and death-focused mythologies: "In the end we see ourselves. We last longer. The night opens its mouth, and we step in."

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