Christopher Heard

  • Depp

    ,

    The truth behind Johnny Depp's bad-boy image in this definitive biography. Accidental actor? Bratty bad boy? Consummate craftsman? Take a little of each, and a whole lot more, and you've got Johnny Depp. Delectably dreamy, dramatically dynamic, and Depp-endably dedicated, this young actor is one of Hollywood's most popular leading men. Depp takes us on a wild ride through Johnny's life, its ups and its downs, its pinnacles and its depths. Join author Christopher Heard, an ardent fan and host of TV's Reel to Real, as he follows Depp's turbulent childhood in Kentucky, his leap into the limelight on TV's 21 Jump Street, and, finally, his extraordinary success in some of his generation's best films. Edward Scissorhands, What's Eating Gilbert Grape?, Donnie Brasco, Ed Wood, Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas - no other actor his age has such an incredibly diverse résumé. Depp explores his roles in these films and his relationships with their directors. Heard also provides as context the details of Depp's personal life - from his young marriage, through his years as tattooed Winona Ryder escort and as Kate Moss paramour to his current status as proud Parisian papa and Paradis lover. Scrutinizing Johnny's shifts as media darling and tabloid target and sifting the truth from the trash in what's been said about him, Depp is the definitive biography of one of this generation's most important, most impassioned, and most independent stars.

  • This is a true story.

    Marc Vachon was born in Montreal in 1963. He went from one foster home to another. He knows the injustices that the weak must suffer in any society. He knows the violence, the abuse, and the emptiness that life can offer in so-called developed countries.

    He dealt with it the only way possible: through drugs and crime. He turned into "a bad egg" as he puts it.

    Until the day when, escaping an unbearable situation at home, he came across Doctors Without Borders (MSF) in Paris. Since he had some experience in construction, he was hired to supervise the logistics of a cholera camp in Niaminthutu, Malawi. From that point on, he drew on the survival instincts he picked up on the streets, delving into his work to forget the pain, never looking back. He made himself indispensable, quickly becoming the frontline logistician for MSF, moving mountains, commanding respect, afraid of nothing or no one, able to build shelters for tens of thousands of refugees in record time.

    Power struggles often occur in the humanitarian sector, and Marc Vachon could never really accept them. They always seem to go hand-in-hand with injustice. This has inspired him to deliver a biting and fascinating review of humanitarian aid, or at least the way it is in the present "news-entertainment" era.

empty