Abe Aamidor

  • Grunge Is Dead weaves together the definitive story of the Seattle music scene through a series of interviews with the people who were there. Taking the form of an "oral" history, this books contains over 130 interviews, along with essential background information from acclaimed music writer Greg Prato.

    The early '90s grunge movement may have last only a few years, but it spawned some of the greatest rock music of all time: Pearl Jam, Nirvana, Alice in Chains, and Soundgarden. This book contains the first-ever interview in which Pearl Jam's Eddie Vedder was willing to discuss the group's history in great detail; Alice in Chains' band members and Layne Staley's mom on Staley's drug addiction and death; insights into the Riot Grrrl movement and oft-overlooked but highly influential Seattle bands like Mother Love Bone/Andy Wood, the Melvins, Screaming Trees, and Mudhoney; and much more.

    Grunge Is Dead digs deeper than the average grunge history, starting in the early '60s, and explaining the chain of events that gave way to the grunge movement. The end result is a book that includes a wealth of previously untold stories and insight for the longtime fan, as well as its renowned story for the newcomer. Grunge Is Dead collects the whole truth of grunge music in one comprehensive volume.

  • In November of 2001, Glen Heggstad decided to ride his motorcycle to the tip of South America. His journey was interrupted when he was kidnapped at gunpoint by Colombian rebels and held captive for five weeks. Yet even after his traumatic incarceration, Glen did what few others would - finished his trip.

    Three years later, frustrated by the climate of fear in a media-saturated world and the resulting stranglehold of self-imposed security in the U.S., Glen decided to look for truth on his own terms - on the back of his motorcycle. Once more the "Striking Viking" left the comforts of California as an unofficial emissary with his own message to the world: We are not afraid and we refuse to hate.

    Starting in Japan, Glen wound his way through Siberia, Mongolia, Europe, the Middle East, South East Asia, and Africa, stopping in over 30 countries. This was not a tourist's bus tour - Glen battled extreme temperatures, knee-deep mud, bureaucratic roadblocks, health problems, and loneliness, but these problems faded to insignificance with the thrill of the open road and the smiling receptions he received from locals and fellow bikers at every turn.

    With One More Day Everywhere, readers can share Glen Heggstad's vision of a world ungoverned by fear and, like Glen, embrace each experience, with one eye always on the horizon.

  • The U.S. auto industry has struck a brick wall. Can it get back on the road to recovery? At the Crossroads: Middle America and the Battle to Save the Car Industry argues that the Obama administration missed an historic opportunity in 2009 to launch a Man

  • For many years the British motorcycle industry was the largest in the world, not counting low-powered mopeds and scooters and the like. After World War II the motorcycle industry was the third largest source of foreign exchange for the United Kingdom after motor cars and Scotch whiskey. Yet by 1975 the industry was essentially dead. What led to the fall of the motorcycle industry in Britain, after virtually defining the country for so long?

    Shooting Star: The Rise and Fall of the British Motorcycle Industry is the first comprehensive look at the motorcycle industry with a critical look at business and trade practices that led to its demise. The full romance, beauty and excitement of the machines and especially the top racers who rode them is captured here, but it's all blended for the first time with information about the lesser known businessmen who built the companies and then ran them into the ground, as well as a critical look at some of the engineers and designers who were brilliant and badly flawed at once. The failures of the British motorcycle industry are a painful object lesson for the badly strapped American automobile industry at the present time.

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